IoT Security Risks: 4 Types of Cyber Attacks to be Aware Of

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The Internet of Things (IoT) has exploded, with more embedded devices being adding every month. From fitness bands and smart appliances to remote patient monitoring devices and industrial equipment, the technology has not just captured the fascination of consumers and businesses, but hackers as well.

IoT presents a new set of security risks that both IT professionals and device manufacturers need to address.

 

Here are 4 Types of Cyber attacks you should be aware of:

1. Physical cyber-attacks

These attacks result from breaches to the IoT device’s sensors. Click to read more about vulnerabilities of IoT embedded devices.

It’s estimated that approximately 70% of all cyber-attacks are initiated from the inside, whether purposeful or the result of human error.

With an IoT physical cyber-attack, the hacker most often accesses the system through close proximity, like inserting a USB drive.

Tampering can enable the intruder to take over the controls, extract data, and/or infuse the system with malicious code (similar to malware) that opens a door to the system without being noticed.

Hackers can also strike with a distributed denial of service (DDoS) that basically shuts down the system. Another physical cyber-attack hits the batteries in the devices and the system. While you think you have them set to sleep mode, the power is actually draining from the batteries.

2. Network cyber-attacks

These don’t require physical access to create a major disruption—like DDoS—in your network. These attackers infiltrate your network devices to see what’s flowing. They can insert themselves between you and your devices (known as “Man in the Middle” or “MitM”), creating fake identities, stealing information, and redirecting packets to their desired location, away from your network (also referred to as a “sinkhole” attack).

3. Software attacks

The third area that poses an IoT security risk is your software. Software attacks occur when malware is installed into your network’s program. This malicious software sends a virus, corrupts or steals data, and can both interrupt and spy on the activities. A software attack can launch a DDoS, too.

4. Encryption attacks

Finally, encryption attacks strike at the heart of your algorithmic system. Hackers analyze and deduce your encryption keys, to figure out how you create those algorithms. Once the encryption keys are unlocked, cyber-assailants can install their own algorithms and take control of your system.

Consequently, it is essential that IoT users maintain an awareness of these cyber risks and put preventative measures in place.  Learn how to put a risk management plan in place here.

Questions?

callCall 800-830-9523 or emailEmail info@L-Tron.com

 

 

About the Author:

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RAD DeRose is the President & CEO of L-Tron Corporation. He has over 30 years experience in industrial automation and data collection technology solutions and brings a deep industry knowledge-base on the challenges faced in the commercial and public safety sectors. RAD can be reached at (800) 830-9523 x114; rad.derose@L-Tron.com